Changes in Quality of Sako Actions over Time

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by South Pender, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. waterwolf

    waterwolf Well-Known Member

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    Put me down as one vote for liking the simplistic and a little "agricultural" design. I've never liked streamlined rifles...bullets okay...not rifles. Unless it is truly ergonomic, "streamlined" rifle design makes about as much sense as the "streamlined" Art Deco radios and lamps from the 1930's.

     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2018

  2. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    Excellent post. Provides perspective on the whole issue.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2018
  3. Webphut

    Webphut Well-Known Member

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    I am from the metal industry. With this in mind and with the hands on experience I have with manual and CNC machinery, I am fine with rifle manufacturers using CNC to make the barrels, but I feel that too much trust has been given to CNC machines for other parts of a rifle. I think if Sako had kept the manual machining of receivers, the quality may have been improved rather than improved in one area and reduced in say like the two piece recoil lug design area. Drilling a barrel and machining something like a receiver, the CNC machine has its place right at home with a barrel, but I am not confident in CNC to say the same about a receiver, on bolt action anyways. Rifle makers before CNC came along are true artists. I would not even know where to begin in order to keep the bore center...lol
    Now I want to say this though, the people manufacturing the Sako's back then were truly talented with what they had to make such gorgeous rifles. Truly pieces of art. And Sako is just one example. I seen some other firearms that have unbelievable ornate engravings that deserve all that ooh and ahh!
     
  4. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sako barrels have been hammer forged since sometime in the 1950's. Hammer forging has been going on long before CNC machining came into existence and doesn't involve any CNC machining to my knowledge.
     
  5. Webphut

    Webphut Well-Known Member

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    I was talking to a Berretta Rep and a Gander Mountain salesman at Gander Mountain about year to year half ago, They both reassured me that new 85's are CNC machined and the Rep was pretty sure the 75's were too, I took this like a grain of salt. I was putting a deposit on a 85 Varmint and so they could have just been trying to make a sale off me. This was when I found the video on Nathan Foster's site when he was unable to accurize the 85. I got my deposit back the next week.
     
  6. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Sako began CNC machining in 1985, 11 years before the 75 & 15 years before Beretta. Referring to your earlier post, I know of no gun maker that uses CNC to make barrels. Can't imagine CNC would be a very efficient way to make barrels.
     
  7. alpine hunter

    alpine hunter Well-Known Member

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    The world has changed and Sako has had to change to be viable.
    Sako has always been a quality but affordable rifle that can be purchased by people of "normal means". Much better than the budget brands but not bespoke either.
    What price would be on the tag of a factory but hand machined and fitted rifle these days?
    I don't know of a modern equivalent but it would price most shooters out of the market and Sako would become a small and obscure brand, if it survived.
    Sako was the rifle of choice for pro roo and fox shooters in the 60s-80s here in Oz because it was quality and they could justify the dollars spent. These days, as a pro shooter myself, I think the modern Sakos fall into the exact same slot in the market. It's just that the market is different than it used to be.
     
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  8. Webphut

    Webphut Well-Known Member

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    This is an excellent point. I think this is also a great example of how diluted the dollar has become. People say you get all this and all that and save money. Personally, I think we get far less for way more money. The ratio of quality to dollar has gone to squat. I honestly do not think that quality standards have kept up with inflation rates at all. Sako has done its best for many many years as business with a targeted customer. If Sako manufactured rifles today the way they use to manufacture rifles decades ago they may have had to close their doors years ago due to price creep of the rifles. To keep that market of customers coming back, unfortunately they too have had to replace older business practices with modern practices to keep prices competitive....in other words drop the quality standards here and there and lowering profit margins just a hair here and there. Eventually this catches up to a business and are only left to subbing most stuff out to importing from assembly line manufacturing practices over seas. Once a product does not pass through a company's/owners/inventors/ hands any longer, quality control goes out the window. Next thing you know you buy from McRifle on McRfifle.com
     
  9. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    Sako didn't make rifles years ago to be competitive. They made rifles because that is what they knew how to do. Cheapening the rifle to be competitive is only a reason to try and get a Ruger buyer to look at buying a Sako. That is not what Sako was in the 60's, 70's and 80's. I think it is more what they have become, not to stay competitive in the quality of the build, but to meld into the current mindset that a rifle is a tool and that is what the current buyer is wanting.

    People with class will always buy good stuff, and most of what is being produced today is not of that same quality. I am still looking for Sako rifles, but not in the crap that is being currently put out under the same name...
     
  10. cl_leg

    cl_leg Well-Known Member

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    Craftsman to innovation.
    The design of the first L46 to match receiver size to catridge was a great idea and put together by a group of true craftsman. These being me favorite. Quality is high with the finish being less in focus.
    The early L461 and L579 are real nice. But then came the "logs" at least the L579 have a much heavier barrel then needed on a sporter. I think this was to keep up with accuracy, just my opinion.
    The A series came with some nice refinements; mostly the stock but also a pencil barrel.
    The 491 and 591 the quality is there but the design was something else.
    75 is an OK come back with the 3 lugs and removable mag but the checkering and metal finish is cheap looking. The HB are just big, i think they over compensated but they make great target rifles.
    85 I really like. The varmint series with the slimmed down the stock so they can be carried is near perfect. The mag release is also a good idea and I am sure if that was on the L46's they wouldnt have changed to the drop down floor plate.

    All great rifles! Quality and innovation.
    Chris
     
  11. Tyler stotler

    Tyler stotler Member

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    I have read the 85's have extraction issues.. is this something that is true or blown Out of proportion. If they did have they been rectified? I ask because I just got a sako 85 varmint 308 because I got tired of the issues I was having with my Remingtons and my gunsmith said sako is the best production rifle period...
     
  12. BFK

    BFK Member

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    We have two M-85 Finnlight SS 7 mm mags. Never had any problems with these two rifles whatsoever. Both are very accurate with our hand loads. Our hunting environment is very dusty which can be harsh on any gun. We ( my son and I) have quite a few Sakos so we have good performance data.
     
  13. Tyler stotler

    Tyler stotler Member

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    Tha is for the reply. I know how the internet can be and I know every product can have its issues I was just hoping this isn't a rifle I'm going to be disappointed with and have problems especially since the amount it costs.
     
  14. Edward12

    Edward12 Member

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