Sako Finland Browning Sako Scope Base

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by kene, Feb 8, 2020.

  1. kene

    kene Member

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    I am new to this forum but have owned a L461 222 for over 50 years [bought it new...]. Am looking at buying a Browning FN hihg power with a medium length Sako action in 22-250 with a medium wt barrel that is in excellent condition but it does not have any scope bases or rings. From what I have read I am guessing that the Sako action is an L579 with a round top. Surfing the web I have not been able to identify what base / ring combination will work with it. Any information will be much appreciated.


    thanks
     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Both Redfield (one piece) and Weaver (two piece) made bases for the Browning-Sako L579. An old catalog shows the Redfield number as 511144 for front screw holes spaced 3/4", and 511131 for front screw holes spaced 7/8". I can't find a reference for the Weaver base numbers.
     
  3. kene

    kene Member

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    There are some replies lost by the computer but one asked for some photos, etc to allow more evaluation by those who know much more than me about these guns. Here are some snapshots I took as well as some additional information about the gun [I did find that Weaver 71 & 72 bases fit so that will give me data for cross referencing into Leupold, etc]. Pix quality is so-so as camera didn't want to focus well.
    Gun data that I know:
    1. Caliber: 22-250
    2. Made in 1969
    3. No sign of "salt wood" when pulling butt plate screw; Cabela corporate wizzards will not allow removing the action but there is no indication of "salt wood" corrosion anywhere that i can see.
    4. Has a heavy bbl [not the more common pencil thin one]
    5. Both crown and front of bolt show little sign of being fired.
    6. Came from a large collection that lived in northwest New Mexico
    7. General condition that I can see is excellent

    My questions:
    1. Anyone have significant issues about the gun as known:
    2. In general how well do these shoot? Sakos are usually pretty accurate but this has the Browning name on it ...
    2. Can the trigger be tuned to a good 3ish pounds?
    2. If used as an occasional shooter should I plan to bed the action?
     

    Attached Files:

  4. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    Kene,
    The Z74 at the end of the serial number in your second photo means the rifle is a Safari made on Sako's L579 action in 1974. There is a slightly less chance that the rifle has salt wood because the rifle was made in the next to last year of production and Browning was well aware of the salt wood problem by then and had begun to source their wood from a new supplier.
     
  5. kene

    kene Member

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    Yeah ... thanks for the note ... saw that when I looked ... the gun shop guy looked at his list and told me 1969 [I didn't check him] but the Z74 says 1974 so there is a low chance of salt wood ... I'll tell him that when I see him.
     
  6. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Both action and barrel were made by Sako, and it will have the Sako #4 trigger which usually will adjust to under 3 pounds. I have the same "medium heavy" barrel rifle in .243 and it shoots quite accurately. The Browning Safari barrels were stepped reminiscent of military Mausers. I find it rather attractive.

    Unless you encounter an accuracy problem that can be traced directly to the bedding, by all means leave it alone.
     

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