Browning pencil barrel .243 question

Discussion in 'Other firearms built on Sako actions' started by Derek Teschler, Aug 8, 2018.

  1. Derek Teschler

    Derek Teschler Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    Does anybody know if the pencil barrel sako action browning all habmve iron sights. The one I am looking at has no front sight or holes tapped but did have. Rear sight in the barrel. barrel is 22 inches. Thanks for any help.
    Derek

     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

    Messages:
    5,886
    Likes Received:
    404
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Texas
    Browning offered the Safari both with and without sights. However, those without sights were drilled & tapped so that sights could be later installed.
     
  3. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    49
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Texas
    Derek, assuming you're talking about Safari rifles made from 1960 thru 1975, the quick answer to "do they all have iron sights" is no. But let me muddy the water for you. First, Browning was well know to accept requests for special orders during this time period, and there are a lot of unusual Safaris out there that are factory original. IMHO I think typically the FN action 243's were 22" pencil barrels with front and rear sights. However, I once owned a Safari 243 FN action, 24" pencil barrel with no sights and it lettered as original. But it was rare as hens teeth. None of my Browning catalogs show the FN action 243 as available with a 24" heavy barrel.

    The Sako action 243's were cataloged as available with 22" pencil barrels with or without sights; or 24" heavy barrel with no sights. Usually the slick 22" pencil barrels are not tapped for front or rear sights. Is yours the sako action?
     
  4. Derek Teschler

    Derek Teschler Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
     
  5. Derek Teschler

    Derek Teschler Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    Thank you for the info. I have not purchased it yet just gave it a really good 5 minute glance. It is a z8 serial number so safari 1968. Made in Finland and measured right at 22inches Correct style browning stock high gloss and correct browning buttplate. I was mainly looking everywhere for rust from salt wood. As my memory serves there were two screws in the barrel for a rear sight but none up front. The barrel has a proper crown so I do not think it was cut.
     
  6. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    49
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Texas
    I did misread your first post. I thought you said it had a rear sight. My reply wasn't real clear either. I should have said ....."I've never seen a slick 22" pencil barrel Safari 243 Browning Sako that was drilled and tapped for front sights; and the slick barrels I've seen were usually not tapped for rear sights, but I have seen a few that were drilled and tapped for rear sights." During this time Browning was also producing a sizable number of barrels for all the sako action calibers they were offering in the Medallion and Olympian grades that were not drilled and tapped for sights on the front or back. So the storage bins contained Sako barrels that were tapped and not tapped. The Safari had a little less polishing than the Medallion and Olympian. Bottom line is, I believe the rifle could be original. Just watch out for salt wood. If I were buying it, I would want to pull it apart to look for salt damage and see if the stock is imprinted with the rifle serial number. If not the wood has probably been replaced. Good luck and welcome to the forum !
     
  7. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

    Messages:
    5,886
    Likes Received:
    404
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Texas
    I suspect that douglastwo is more accurate on the D&T issue than I am. I've only owned one Safari NIB, and that was many years ago. I remember it having no sights and filler screws, but the filler screws may have been in the action and there may have been no holes for sights. Subsequently I've owned Safaris with no sights but with sight holes using filler screws, however, these were used guns which may have originally had sights that were removed by a previous owner.

    One of the surest tests for salt wood is to pull a buttplate screw. Since these screws have full contact with the wood they tend to show salt-induced corrosion first. Some people wish to have nothing at all to do with a gun that shows even the slightest sign of salt. Others aren't afraid of a "light salt" gun as a shooter -- you clean up the metal and seal the exposed wood surfaces so that future salt exposure is minimized. Such guns can make excellent shooters, although certainly not collectors (unless you have a fascination with Browning salt wood and like to see how many examples you can own:confused:.)
     
  8. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

    Messages:
    1,620
    Likes Received:
    99
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Virginia
    Derek, I believe what you are seeing is Browning/Sako factory original. I have the same gun, exactly as you have described, but mine was made in 1966 and is a .22-250.

    show us some pics when you buy it !
    DeerGoose
     
  9. Derek Teschler

    Derek Teschler Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    Thanks for all the replies. I will take a few screws out before committing to it and clear the salt wood possibility.
     
  10. Derek Teschler

    Derek Teschler Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    Thanks for all the replies. I will take a few screws out before committing to it and clear the salt wood possibility.
     
  11. Derek Teschler

    Derek Teschler Member

    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Arizona
    Has the original stock and looks like it is not too salty. Has some handling Mark's but everybody I have spoken with said do not redo the stock. 20180811_103237.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  12. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

    Messages:
    2,331
    Likes Received:
    153
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Iowa
    If it is a salt cured stock that Browning stupidly used from the mid 60's to the early 70's you have no choice but to replace it or take corrective measures. That is unless you don't care that the metal suffers the effects the corrosion will administer to it's demise. First step is to take the barreled action out of the stock so you can actually analyze what you have & what, if any, damage has occurred. Ask the people that are advising you not to "redo" the stock if they would buy a "Salt Stock" Browning. If they say yes & it is, sell it to them. To many other nice, problem free rifles out there to waste time, money & effort messing with a "Salty". Just my two cents.
     
    douglastwo likes this.
  13. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    330
    Likes Received:
    49
    Country Flag:
    USA
    State/Region:
    US Texas
    Paulson is right. The reason they are telling you not to "redo" the stock is because the consensus is it will not stop the rust if the stock is salty. Even if your stock only has small "hot spots" that are slightly salty a new complete refinish or applying some sealer on the just the hot area will not stop the rust.
     

Share This Page

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Okay More information