Browning 30-06 worth?

Discussion in 'Valuation Corner' started by Tara3015, Sep 4, 2021.

  1. Tara3015

    Tara3015 Member

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    I recently inherited a Browning and was told that y’all would be better able to help me. I have no need for this rifle but it is so beautiful that if it is not worth much I will just keep it. The serial number I see on it is 65614 L73. If anyone has a clue please let me know. Any help would be so appreciated!:)

     

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  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    From what I am able to make out from the pics your Browning is not one made on the Sako action. It's from a later period & most likely is a FN Mauser action. Value is always elusive & will vary depending on a multitude of factors. Put it on one of the internet auction sights & you will get what it's market value is "that day". Any gun is only worth what a willing buyer & a willing seller agree to. Nice rifle! You may get more info from a Browning forum. Finding out what exactly you have will allow you to search for comparable sales. Not sure why you were told a Sako forum is the place to ask, but others here may know more.
     
  3. bigcountry4me

    bigcountry4me Well-Known Member

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    Most folks here typically are interested in the Browning rifles built on Sako actions, so there might be limited feedback. However and obviously, your Safari grade Browning is a cased very fine rifle. It’s built on an FN (Fabrique Nationale) action.

    The case and documentation are a huge plus. .30-06 is a classic cartridge, but it’s also common with regard to a collector’s prospective. I’d highly recommend comparing it to like specimens online (Gunbroker, Guns International) for the sake of a benchmark. Most likely the rifle alone would bring $1200-1400. I’d speculate a premium of $300-400 extra for the case and documentation. However doing your own homework is prudent.

    The serial number should put the rifle from 1973 which should be past the salt years. Early rifles had a corrosion issue because of salt curing process related to the stock. Typically you can see corrosion below the wood line if it’s an affected rifle.
     
  4. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    You have a very nice rifle with wood that is definitely better than average. Sako didn't provide any long actions to Browning, just short and medium actions, so yours is an FN action. Being a 1973 gun it is most likely free of salt wood. The salt wood problem started in 1966, peaked on 1969 and was over with in the early 70's. To me the pictures don't indicate any signs of salt wood. If I were selling it, I would break it apart and sell the scope ($200) and case ($300) separate from the rifle, with mounts, sling and instruction manual ($1100 to $1200). Selling it all together at $1600 to $1700 might be difficult. You can offer the ammo as a carrot. Be certain you have no need for a very nice rifle, because that is one.
     

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