Bofors Stamp

Discussion in 'General Sako Discussions' started by Lars Pyykkønen, Oct 24, 2020.

  1. Lars Pyykkønen

    Lars Pyykkønen Active Member

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    I have just used the Factory Record Service for a couple of rifles. I would say they were professional and it just took a few days for the results. I am glad to have access to and pay for this service. Since I am new, I don't know if the next questions I ask has been discussed or not.

    I have two L61R in .300 Win. Mag. both serial numbers 38,xxx. Both were produced in 1969 and both have Bofors stamps. I have been told the Bofors stamp was last used in mid-late 1968. A couple large Sako collectors/sellers in Montana have told me these rifles can not exist. Are there other 1969 rifles out there with Bofors stamps? Was this a .300 Win Mag. thing? How can I prove these are authentic rifles?

    I have a VL63 & a L61R in 270 both manufactured in 1969, neither have the Bofors stamp.


    Thank You to all in advance
     

  2. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    I also have a .300WM Sporter Bofors marked rifle, very close to your serial numbers. Mine is definitely original. No question about it. I’d say yours are too.

    The Bofors stamp was discontinued as part of litigation but that doesn’t mean Sako threw the left over barrel inventory away. I’m very confident as other will tell you, it’s highly conceivable there are specimens of all calibers that bled into 69 with the stamp.

    Take some quality photos of the caliber and Bofors stamp if you want other to express an opinion.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
  3. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The factory records should be proof enough that the rifles are legitimate, but it is common knowledge that Sako sent out a few "Bofors" rifles from left over inventory well after the year 1968 ended. Sako never abruptly ended any model or feature. They never wasted parts just because they made a change to something. Remember it was the "threat" of litigation from Bofors that ended the "stamping", not a court order, so Sako wasn't about to throw a few perfectly good barrels away. It's even possible they had a "gentleman's" agreement with Bofors to use up the Bofors barrels already in inventory. The fellas in Montana are mistaken. I have even heard of a Bofors barreled rifle past 1969, but 1968 is when the practice ceased as a standard practice.
     
  4. Lars Pyykkønen

    Lars Pyykkønen Active Member

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    Thank You. That was very well put. The "threat of litigation" is a point most always left out. What the factory practiced in 1968 has been replaced as hard rules in many peoples minds and discussions around the campfire.
     
  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Paulson's explanation is spot on. We've discovered a number of Sakos produced post-1968 with the Bofors mark.

    One of the Montana sellers you reference is an older gentleman who, so far as I've been told, is honest, but is sometimes uninformed.

    The other Montana seller has been banned from this site and often misrepresents the Sakos he sells, implying that they are original but may actually be put-togethers ("bitsas, as our Aussie friends call them) with mismatched parts and replica stocks.

    Neither of these persons has the Sako Factory records which the Club possess and researches on behalf of its members.
     
    deergoose likes this.
  6. Lars Pyykkønen

    Lars Pyykkønen Active Member

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    OK. I don't want to ruffle any feathers; however, I now have concerns. I am getting ready to send one of my VL63's to Custom Shop Inc. in Hamilton, Mt. The old .308 has seen better days. I was going to have a new stock built and have them blue it. I talked to a guy named Louie. He said no one in the county works on more Sakos then they do. He said he has made over a dozen stocks for VL63's. He won't just send me a stock. He needs the gun to fit it. The work on there web site looks gorgeous. I'm not looking for anyone to bash them. Should I have concerns about sending the VL63 to them?
     
  7. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The Custom Shop in Hamilton, MT (not to be confused with Mike's Custom Shop in the same town) has a dubious reputation when it comes to misrepresenting rifles he is trying to sell as "original". He parses his words enough where it's not easy to accuse him of out & out lying, but that's what he is doing. Remember Bill Clinton?? However, the stock smith he has doing his stocks is very talented & the work is very tastefully done. As long as one doesn't try to deceive a potential buyer about the stocks "originality" I don't see anything wrong in having a beautiful custom stock put on your Finnwolf. It's your rifle & your money so do what pleases you. Louie is quite a slick talker & I personally wouldn't do business with him, but that's just me. Have you considered having your original stock professionally refinished? If not and you have a new stock made, you won't have any trouble selling the original.
     
  8. Lars Pyykkønen

    Lars Pyykkønen Active Member

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    I think I have all the information I need. I may talk to the folks at Precision Bluing. I've seen very nice work from them. I'm not ready to sell it. Rifle or stock. I carried that gun for three years while working in the Canadian bush. At 23, I didn't have the appreciation for it as I do now. It was another tool. Part of the reason its not in great shape. I hope the kids will have an appreciation for the rifles and their ancestry one day. I would like to pass my rifles down to them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
  9. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Custom shop produces new knock-off Sako stocks for out-of-production models that are difficult to tell from the originals and appear to be of high quality. They are also very expensive. And not unlike a masterfully, but illicitly produced twenty dollar bill, the unsuspecting often accept them as originals. Please don't misunderstand: There is nothing illegal or immoral about reproducing excellent copies of factory stocks. It is only when people are misled about their provenance that standards of honesty are breached.

    As Paulson suggests, unless there is something structurally wrong with your original stock then a talented stock refinisher can make it like new, and probably for much less cost (and no fitting) than that of a new stock.

    There are hundreds of gunsmiths (both full and part-time) who are capable of doing a beautiful rebluing job.
     

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