Bedding a Wood Stock Sako 85

Discussion in 'Sako 75, 85 and A7' started by South Pender, Jun 13, 2019.

  1. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    I'm considering purchasing a walnut-stock Sako 85 in 270 Win. I've read about the odd recoil-lug setup consisting of a metal plate screwed into the top inletting of the stock, with a lug on the bottom of the receiver dropping into a recess in the plate. This sure seems unreasonably complicated when simply machining the more usual recoil lug on the bottom of the receiver (as with the L- and A-series Sakos) would have been better. This approach should have been easy since, if they can machine the small lug on the receiver bottom to fit into the hole in the plate, they presumably could have machined a wider and deeper lug to function on its own as the recoil lug. However, maybe I'm missing something here.

    I'm wondering whether anyone has tried either pillar-bedding, or just glass-bedding, this action. I can see an easy pillar installation at the rear tang, but am not sure how you'd do a front pillar. Maybe topping out on the bottom of the metal plate?


    The advantage I see for pillar bedding is keeping the tension on the action from the stock constant with changing weather conditions. Glass bedding, without the pillars, might help in this regard as well.

    What do you all think?
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019

  2. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    Why are you considering "bedding" a gun you have yet to shoot? It might shoot just fine as is. Unless a hunting rifle has accuracy problems that can be traced back to some serious bedding flaws, it's usually not worth the effort to bed it. I think you will find the 85 will shoot better than you can hold under field conditions. Chances are it will shoot MOA or better with the right load/ammo. You don't have to make it a benchrest rifle to shoot game out to the effective range of the cartridge. Just my two cents.
     
  3. South Pender

    South Pender Well-Known Member

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    Good points, Paulson. It's not really to improve accuracy that I'd consider pillar- or glass-bedding it, but more to keep it stable through the considerable weather changes (rain forest to desert) that we have in the Pacific Northwest. With a properly pillar-bedded rifle, with the action resting on the pillars, the tension on the action will remain constant through swelling and shrinkage of the wood stock as we go from wet to dry conditions. I've had all my rifles--hunting, target, and benchrest--pillar-bedded for this reason. The 85, though, would seem to present some new challenges!

    I might add that I've used the term "bedding" here to refer to either pillar- or glass-bedding. Strictly speaking, all rifles are "bedded" in some fashion, of course, even if it's only the wood inletting. I've discovered, however, that most forum members (on this and other gun forums), use the term "bedding" to refer to something beyond the original wood bedding.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2019
  4. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    Pillar bedding should not present too much of a challenge, on a wood stocked Sako 85. The wood stocked rifle utilizes a slightly different plate but still a qualified smith or perhaps yourself should be able to perform this modification.

    Glass bedding might also benefit a wood stocked rifle as well, but the synthetic stocked 85’s in my opinion would not benefit because the mounting plate tolerance into the stock groove is very tight. There can be some minor slop in the stock slot on wood rifles, and the plate is held in place by two wood screws. Therefore. bedding compound in the rear portion of the plate might help further stabilize the action.

    Below is a profile shot showing how a front pillar might fit in a Synthetic stock. A wood stock should be nearly the same regarding pillar length, obviously there could be minor variances.
     

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    Last edited: Jun 14, 2019

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