Any good way to repair this chipped rosewood grip cap?

Discussion in 'Tips and Tricks for gunsmithing your own Sako' started by Charles Witt, Jan 3, 2020.

  1. Charles Witt

    Charles Witt Member

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    L579 Chipped Grip Cap.jpg L579 Chipped Grip Cap close up.jpg

     

  2. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    Can you please take a more detailed photo or two? It would be best to roll the grip cap straight up, take a shot, then take one from the side It’s difficult at the angle you’ve shot it at to gain depth.

    About the only method I’d recommend is to carefully, delicately and evenly sand (by hand) the chip out, then refinish the bare wood to match. The entire grip cap should be done to avoid a divot. This must be done with the utmost care but I believe it can be accomplished. If properly done with the proper technique, it would be very difficult to detect, provided there’s not more damage than meets the eye.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2020
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  3. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    Unless you know what you are doing with finishes, I would leave it alone or take it to someone that does. Rosewood doesn’t take a finish easily and that is generally the wood on the grip cap and fore end...
     
  4. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    No sanding please. The best and only way to fix this is to leave it alone. If you are more adventuresome you can us a lacquer stick. Carefully fill in the divot and smooth the fill so no sanding is required. Trick is going to get a color that matches and then adeptly heat a suitable applicator and fill in the divot. This takes a steady hand and an experienced woodworker.

    rick
     
  5. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    I'm guessing it not the only imperfection the rifle has, so it's best to just leave it alone as it's not going to change it's market value if you "fix" it. In fact, a repair gone wrong can lower it's value. If little dings bother you, the only way to properly fix it so no one can tell is to refinish the whole stock while replacing the crushed recoil pad. The spray on finish Sako used on these early guns is very difficult to match or remove. The fact that it is on Rosewood amplifies the problem.
     
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  6. Sean Hodges

    Sean Hodges Well-Known Member

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    It probably would have been better if I’d have included some words about experience. I sometimes take for granted my level vs. others. So my bad for that. Not bragging but this is a basic sand, blend and refinish type repair. Done tons of them. I’ve found Rosewood to be forgiving and with a clear finish it would blend easily with the factory finish quite well.
     
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  7. Paul B.

    Paul B. Well-Known Member

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    Personally, I'd leave it be as it appears to be rather minor.
     

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