264 win mag

Discussion in 'Factory Records Services' started by Chris5199, Jan 31, 2017.

  1. Chris5199

    Chris5199 Member

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    Just bought a 264 win mag trying to find out year it is a l6ir no# 12xx

     

  2. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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  3. vigo

    vigo Well-Known Member

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    Hello Chris,
    An L61R long action, Finnbear, in .264 Win. Mag., serial number 12xx, would make it most likely a 1961 production rifle. The number 61 in the L61R marking on the action stands for 1961, which was the first year of production of the long action caliber "Finnbear" model. I also would guess the barrel length is 26 inches. Would be nice to see some pictures to see the condition, as the serial number dates it to be a very early L61R action "Finnbear" model in a fairly scarce caliber for SAKO during this time period. Carl
     
  4. Chris5199

    Chris5199 Member

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    CARL here are some pictures do you have a ballpark on price don't want to hunt with it if it's valuable
     

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  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    There is rarely such a thing as a Sako which is too valuable to hunt with. That is what they were made for.

    Your rifle is very desirable, but as a standard grade with a replaced butt pad it is not in the "collectible" class. The top of the receiver has likely been drilled and tapped to mount the Buehler adjustable base for the Bausch & Lomb scope, so that also keeps it from being of much interest to a collector. Continuing to use it in the field, provided you are reasonably careful with it, won't have much impact on its value. Besides, a buyer would almost certainly be buying it to shoot, not to simply admire.

    The .264 chambering is one of the more sought-after in the L61R Sako, so you can expect it to command perhaps 20 to 30 percent more than one of the more common calibers in similar condition.
     

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