25-06 Recipes?

Discussion in 'Hand loading your Sako' started by Old Hippie, Aug 6, 2021.

  1. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Looking for anyone who would like to offer advice. I’ll be interested in cocktails for 100g-120g
    Pills. Does anyone use 7828 SCC? Looking for a good whitetail hunting load.

    Hippie

     

  2. Unclekax

    Unclekax Well-Known Member

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    Hogdonreloading.com data center
    Great place to start
    Kax
     
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  3. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Thanks Uncle Kax , I’ve used their website for years, along with Nosler and Sierra manuals.
    Was more in hopes to find info or discussion from others regarding what worked well for them.
    Thanks for at least chiming in with some help.

    The old Hippie
     
  4. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    What worked well in someone else's rifle has no relation to how it will work in your rifle. I think you will find most here reluctant to give load recommendations for that reason, as well as from a safety standpoint. Load data given by the bullet & powder companies has been through extensive testing & the powders listed are your best choices. My experience has been that usually powders that fill the case around 90% or better work better than powders that leave more airspace or need compression. It's up to you to find what works best in YOUR rifle. I generally start with bullet choices best suited to the task & go through the trials of using different powders. I usually never get the best accuracy from max loads. Heavy for caliber bullets at moderate velocities usually give the best terminal performance for me. Enjoy the experiment, as there are no short cuts.
     
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  5. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Paulson is absolutely correct about this.

    However, I use exclusively IMR7828SSC in my .25-06 and have had occasion to use the identical load in two other Sako .25-06's where it worked equally well. Unusually, it not only did well in all three, but the once-fired cases would fit any of the three, which is almost unheard of.

    Please don't simply duplicate this load as it may not be safe or appropriate in your rifle, so start below and work up: 55 grains of IMR7828SSC under a Nosler 115 grain Ballistic Tip, WW WLR primer. Chronographed velocity from my rifle is 3125 fps.

    By the way, I've never owned a piece of .25-06 brass. All of mine is reformed from .30-06 (the way it was done for upteen years before the .25-06 became a factory standardized cartridge.) I find no difference in the performance of ammunition on the first firing after reforming (when the little crease where the '06 neck started is still visible) and subsequent firings with neck-sized brass. The same is true of my Sako .280 where I use nothing but reformed '06 brass.
     
  6. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    Thanks Stone!
    That was more or less what I was interested in finding. I have not shot much of the 7828ssc. I started with 100g Hornady A max bullets, CCI large rifle primers with charges from 52.5g up to 55g. Best group was over 1.5” with 53g , which is good enough to hunt with but not even close to what hand loading brings to my other chamberings.
    I use factory 2506 brass , WW and Hornady for the most. I’ve never attempted to resize 30-06 brass. Can the same be done with 270win brass? I have a ton of it.
    I completely understand the valid points of safety in hand loading that have been mentioned here. Was only trying to narrow the window of experimental cost in the development process.

    Thank you all

    Hippie
     
  7. kevinlg

    kevinlg Well-Known Member

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    Hip.......

    You can.....but the 06 case is about 0.046" shorter.
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    As Kevin indicates, you can resize .270 brass for your .25-06 but you'll need to trim it a bit since it will be too long. The same may be true with .30-06 brass since when you reduce the diameter of the neck the brass has to go somewhere, so the case gets a little longer. Trimming and chamfering after resizing is pretty routine, anyway.

    By the same token, when using .30-06 brass for the longer .270 Win and .280 Rem the action of reducing the neck diameter makes the case a little longer which is a better match for these two slightly longer cases. The shoulder of the .270 is in the same place as the '06, so it requires little attention. The shoulder of the .280 is further forward, so '06 cases are run into the die just far enough to allow them to chamber and headspace on a "false shoulder" created when the .30 cal neck is reduced to .28 cal.

    Lots of folks refuse to use brass which isn't marked on the headstamp with the correct size. This has never bothered me since I've never depended on the headstamp to identify ammunition -- it tells you nothing about the bullet weight, powder charge, etc. All it tells you is what cartridge it was intended for when it was originally manufactured.
     
  9. Old Hippie

    Old Hippie Formerly known as bloorooster

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    I’ll check it out, Like I said, I’ve always used unprimed or once fired brass specific to caliber. I do have a surplus of brass in calibers I no longer shoot.
    Trimming is not a problem, like you said, I trim and chamfer everything anyways. I need to try it just to understand that aspect of resizing and the physics that take place when forming brass from one caliber to another without distortion or damage.

    Thanks again guys

    Hippie
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Hippie: A couple of things about reforming brass cases.

    New or once-fired cases usually work just fine. But if you have cases which have been fired and reloaded multiple times then they should be annealed before reforming since the necks will be work hardened to some degree and may split if squeezed to another caliber.

    Normal full length dies usually work fine for simple neck-downs where the shoulder of the case isn't being moved, or moved only minimally. You can buy expensive "case forming die sets" from various manufacturers, but I've never found the need of them.

    Cases should be properly lubricated, but don't over-lube or you'll get creases and dents in the shoulders. Small dents aren't the end of the world since they'll iron out on the first firing of the reloaded round.

    I've used .30-06 cases for .25-06, .280, .270, and 8x57. Years ago when I owned a .257 Roberts I would take them all the way down to that caliber. Betcha didn't know that you can even use .30-06 cases to make shotshells for the .45 ACP. I've used plenty of .308 cases for .243. Have made .222 from .223, as well as .300 Blackout from .223. Another SCC member taught me to make 7x33 Sako from .350 Legend, and they work like a charm. I once owned a Ruger 77 in 6.5 Remington Magnum (should never have sold such a rare bird, of course); I made cases for it from .264 brass and killed a coyote and a whitetail with it before sending it down the road for a lot less money than I should have. Perhaps one of the most challenging conversions is .357 Magnum to .256 Winchester -- requires both a proper annealing and some good luck to go with it, but can be done (this is probably one of those instances in which a set of intermediate forming dies would be helpful.)

    Sometimes you don't reform, but simply fire the right round in a different chamber to make fresh brass. I've done this with .22 Hornet in a K-Hornet and .300 H&H in a .300 WBY. In a pinch, you can even seat the bullets out to engage the lands (a false type of headspacing) and make extremely short-necked .222 Magnum brass from .223. I wouldn't recommend this as a steady practice, but it would let you shoot a .222 Magnum for which you could obtain no other brass or ammunition.

    Well, this is straying from the subject, but illustrates that there can be a lot of adaptations made with cartridge brass when the need arises.
     

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