Short Actions 218 Bee on GI Sold this AM is it real?

Discussion in 'Sako Short Actions' started by ricksengines, Aug 12, 2019.

  1. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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  2. mlesh

    mlesh Member

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    Do you know what is sold for?? thanks mike
     
  3. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    Legit. Looks like the bolt has been jeweled and sling studs installed. Rifle looked to be in decent shape, what was the asking price ?

    DeerGoose
     
  4. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Sorry but the price was blocked out after it sold.

    rick
     
  5. Tomball

    Tomball Well-Known Member

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    I have seen photos of 4 roll stamped like this and one rifle in my hands like this A fellow member from down under bought one like this IIRC correctly and posted some photos . Seems to be April 1950 approx build/ ship, did they stamp Bofors on barrel during that period? I do have anything that old to check for myself.
     
  6. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    It left the factory as a .218 Bee. It appears the only modifications are those mentioned by Deergoose. Sure wish I knew what the selling price was.

    Actions with serial numbers below the 7000's are often equipped with the LH wing safety. But there are obviously exceptions like this one, which was born in January of 1950.
     
  7. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Hi Everyone

    Many Thanks for the input. I got suspicious when I looked at the chamber ID on the side of the barrel. It appears that the 218 was hand struck as the "8" is out of place and overstruck at least once. Also, I have seen 218 Bee rifles with caliber marking just like this one but they were crisp and professionally done which is characteristic of Sako quality. Finally, I was expecting to see a Bofors mark on the right side of the barrel but nada on that score.
     
  8. douglastwo

    douglastwo Well-Known Member

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    I don't often check the sale price on GI, but of the 10 or so times I've checked, the sale price has always been listed. Does not listing the price raise any flags, or is that an option the buyer or seller can request?
     
  9. Tomball

    Tomball Well-Known Member

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    Once sold, seller edits listing as sold and price is replaced with “sold”
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Sako didn't start using the Bofors Steel mark until about 1957.
     
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  11. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    OK Thanks everybody for contributing.

    rick
     
  12. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The rifles from the late 40's & even into the early 50's didn't show the "quality" you are associating with the later rifles. In fact, they were rather crudely built, from a cosmetic standpoint, compared to other rifles of the same period. Inconsistent & misaligned stamping, mixing different features like safety types, sights, etc within the same time frame, crudely finished birch stocks (brushed on finish), crudely stamped & finished metal parts & poor or even non-existent checkering are just a few examples. Only through the urging of Firearms International & the lure of the American market did Sako improve to what we admire today. I recently refinished a 7x33 Sako Mannlincher stock from the 50's that had 18 LPI checkering on the pistol grip area & 20 LPI checkering on the forearm. Makes me wonder where "quality control" was that day!
     
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  13. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Right. They improved the cosmetics to meet the demands of FI and the American market. However, the Sako shop always produced high quality, well-fitted actions and barrels made of the best steels, even when they paid minimal attention to the appearance of their rifles. We have to remember that they sprang from a military refurbishment shop, so it took a while to move away from the minimalist look of the military rifles they were accustomed to working with.
     
  14. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    Also, Finland at the time was recovering from a devastating war with Russia. Everything was in short supply, including skilled craftsmanship. Finland was not the shining, high-tech industrial powerhouse it is today. In the late 1940's, Sako was still selling sporterized m/39 military rifles for the domestic market (in addition to the L46). Those rifles were extremely accurate and reliable, but not necessarily pretty. Sako sporting rifles became a semi-luxury product in the 1950's when management decided to go for the American market.
     
  15. Jeffy1

    Jeffy1 Member

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    The Bee was sold for $2300.
     
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  16. Rocky

    Rocky Well-Known Member

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    That was a good buy!
     
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  17. ricksengines

    ricksengines Sako-addicted

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    Must have been an inside job as it was sold as soon as the post hit the GI site.
     
  18. blackjack

    blackjack Well-Known Member

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    Hello Paul,

    My L46 - 6,3 X 33 R which came out of production 1st October 1949 is not crude at all. If you look at the photo's of my 6, 3 X 33R on the SCC you will see that my rifle's serial numbers, Sako name, Town and calibre markings are all neat, tidy and alligned. There are NO crudley stamped metal parts, and although only chequered on the pistol - grip with birch stock there is nothing crude about this particular rifle. I think during the late 40's & early 50's the U.S.A. demanded from Sako chequered walnut stocks, which I think should of remained Artic Birch. Trust the Yanks to spoil things - some things should just be left alone.

    Blackjack { England Gt. Britain }
     
  19. icebear

    icebear Well-Known Member

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    That's a question of taste - and I'd say you are in the minority. Arctic birch is a good stock wood; I have many Finnish military rifles with such stocks and some of them are quite attractive. For that matter, my dining room set is custom made from solid birch and it's beautiful. However, for rifle stocks, most of us prefer walnut, especially if it has visible grain or figuring. Birch is slightly harder; density is about the same. As for "Leave it to the Yanks to spoil things," I can only respond with two words: English food.
     
  20. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary Forum Owner SCC Board Member

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    Well, I think their fish and chips are okay.

    I don't think there's any question that walnut makes a generally more attractive stock wood than birch. And that Sako's attention to cosmetic detail was lacking in the early days. However, if I were going to build reproductions of vintage Sakos I'd certainly make them like the late 1940's "pre-Firearms International" models with flamed birch, barrel bands, and ladder sights. There is something "earthy" and fundamental about those early L46's that transcends the beauty of fine walnut and deeply polished bluing.
     

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