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Let's talk about Sako L57 and L579 in .244 Rem

Discussion in 'Sako Medium Actions' started by ricksengines, Nov 3, 2017.

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  1. ricksengines

    ricksengines Well-Known Member

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    So we know that the L57 was produced in .244 Remington for about two years (1958 - 1959) it was superseded by the L579 and also chambered in .244 Remington. So the question is, which of these variants is more collectable? In addition, what are the differences between the two models. Did Sako make the L57 .244 in both the standard rifle configuration and the heavier varmint version? Were these two different configurations also produced for the .244 in the L579 model? Did Sako change the rifling twist rate in the L579 .244 version to accommodate heavier 6mm bullets? There are probably more questions but I would like to leave it up to our members to get this thread rolling.


    rick
     

  2. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    Great Topic, ricksengines! To answer your questions in sequential order (according to my understanding and opinion):

    1) L57 is more collectible
    2) Differences between the two models (actions) are the same as for any other chambering
    3) L57 standard and varmint: YES
    4) L579 standard and varmint: YES
    5) rifling twist rate change: NO, but I'm not 100% sure on this one

    DeerGoose
     
  3. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I did buy a L57 in 244 and I measured the twist at 1/10.5. I don't care about fast twist because I only shoot light bullets in it. I have always liked the L57 and L46 actions, but I'm am equally fond of the 579 and 461 in their early years. If it is Bofors marked with a plastic grip cap, I am a fan. I have access to a 579 in 244 that is nearly mint, I just haven't done anything since I have bought so many recently. I still think I should, as there can't be many of them...
     
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  4. ricksengines

    ricksengines Well-Known Member

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    Hi Goose.

    Thanks for commenting so quickly. I try to think up topics that might be of interest. Hopefully this one will garner many more comments especially more discussion on rarity, rifling twist and other variations.

    rick
     
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  5. ricksengines

    ricksengines Well-Known Member

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    Hi Goose,

    So between the L57 and the L579 in .244 how do we know that the L57 variant is more collectable? Do we have any production numbers that indicate that fewer .244 L57 rifles were produced? Do we have any production numbers that speak to the numbers of standard rifles produced as opposed to the number of varmint versions? Inquiring minds want to know!

    rick
     
  6. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary SCC Board Member

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    Although we don't have the numbers of .244 produced in each of the L57 and L579, most people would consider the older L57 to be the more "collectible", particularly since there were many fewer L57's made (in any caliber) than L579's. The most desirable and hardest to find would probably be the Deluxe L57.

    With only the somewhat approximate "tight patch" method of measuring twist it's hard to read it exactly. Where kirkbridger measured 10.5" on his, I measured 11.25" on mine. I wouldn't be surprised if his barrel and mine were the same, the only difference being who was doing the measuring and how readily each measurer's cleaning rod handle's bearings allowed the patch to follow the twist. But the proof is in the pudding -- my barrel, whatever its twist, handles the Remington 6mm 100 grain factory loads quite accurately.
     
  7. ricksengines

    ricksengines Well-Known Member

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    Hi Stone

    Thanks very much for the input. As I surmised, because the L57 was only in production for two years or so it stands to reason that fewer rifles were produced in virtually any of the calibers offered than the L579. That said, Sako did produce the .244 in the l579 but if I am not mistaken discontinued offering the L579 in that caliber in favor of producing it in 6MM. It would be interesting to know when that cutover actually occurred because we might be surprised to find out that the L579 actually had a short run of .244 rifles built to compare to the number of L57 rifles produced in that caliber. Anybody have any thoughts on that score?

    rick
     
  8. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary SCC Board Member

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    Nope. To this day Sako has not produced a rifle stamped 6mm Remington.

    Not that one person's experience in just one location is necessarily indicative, but I've seen more L579's than L57's in .244 in my years as an attentive Sako enthusiast. Others may have had a different experience.
     
  9. ricksengines

    ricksengines Well-Known Member

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    Here is the discussion on the 6mm from the L579 6MM thread by Paul..

    The 6mm Remington is the same case as the .244 Remington. The difference is in the twist rate. Rifles stamped 244 have a 1 in 12" twist & won't stabilize bullets approaching 95 gr. or more. The 6mm stamped rifles will have a 1 in 9" twist & will stabilize bullets in excess of 100 gr. How your particular rifle will shoot any particular bullet can only be determined by shooting it. Are you sure the rifle in question is not a 244 or one that has been rebarreled to 6mm? I don't recall seeing any factory L579's in 6mm Rem, but my recall capacity is limited.

    OK so given that Sako never roll stamped an L579 in 6MM was there a twist rate change some time during production or were all .244s' made with the same twist rate?

    Another question, are L57 standard rifles in .244 more common than varmint rifles made in the same caliber?
     
  10. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary SCC Board Member

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    Most definitely.
     
  11. paulsonconstruction

    paulsonconstruction Sako-addicted

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    The 243 Win was out selling the 244 Rem about 20 to 1, so Sako just dropped the 244 & didn't pick up on the Rem when it was reintroduced as the 6mm Rem with a 9 twist. American importer probably just said don't bother. As the 244 was made throughout the almost 3 year run of the L57, I don't think it lasted that long in the L579. That and the demand for the 243 Win probably lessened it's numbers also. I agree with Stone that the L579 244's are scarcer.
     
  12. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    I have several .244s. Most of them are in L57, and I think I have one sporter and one heavy BBL model in L579. I've shot all of them except the '57 carbine that I have with normal 100gr factory ammo. All have shot excellent. In fact, I have a Remington mdl 721 in .244 and it also shoots the 100gr bullets just fine.

    I know they had lots of problems with the heavier bullets in .244, but my experience has been just the opposite, especially with the Sakos. Go figure.

    DeerGoose
     
  13. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary SCC Board Member

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    I also had a Rem 721 .244 which I gave to a friend as a thank you for helping me build a cabin. It shot lighter bullets beautifully, but the Nosler Solid Base 100 grainers which I used (and still use) in my Sako .243 would keyhole every time out of the Remington. I never shot any Remington factory 100 grainers in it, but they may very well be enough shorter or otherwise different from the Noslers that they stabilize just fine in the 721.
     
  14. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    Here's an L579 sporter in .244. Serial #12,xxx and stamped 'Bofors'. 100gr. CoreLokts.....no problem.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. ricksengines

    ricksengines Well-Known Member

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    OK so to sum up.... Sako made the .244 in both L57 and L579 configurations. L579 Sako models in .244 are harder to come by because not many were made as compared to the numbers produced in L57 configurations. Regardless of the model or configuration (sport or varmint) all shoot pretty darn good including heavier 6MM pills weighting up to 100 grains.

    If I am mistaken, pardon my dust and feel free to make correction. Thanks everyone for contributing. I hope everyone learned something from this thread. I know I did.

    rick
     
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  16. deergoose

    deergoose Sako-addicted

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    And....here's an L579 Heavy BBL model in .244. Serial #16,xxx and stamped 'Bofors'. Again, 100gr CoreLokts....no problem.
    IMG_0608.JPG IMG_0608.JPG IMG_0621.JPG IMG_0631.JPG
     
  17. stonecreek

    stonecreek SCC Secretary SCC Board Member

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    DG: Have you ever tried measuring the twist in any of your .244's? I've measured three and all have come out (as best my feeble faculties can tell) about 1-11.25". I haven't measured a Sako .243 since it has never seemed to be an issue, but they are apparently a tighter twist than the contemporaneous .244's -- I suppose following SAAMI specs.
     
  18. NPhillips

    NPhillips Active Member

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    Thanks for the interesting read. I just picked up a L579 .244 sporter. Now to shoot it...I've picked up factory 80 grain and 100 grain Rem and Winchesters...hope they both shoot.
     
  19. kirkbridgershooters

    kirkbridgershooters Well-Known Member

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    I bought a Sako Riihimaki in 22 Hornet, 218 Bee and a L57 in 244 from one gentleman. He has notified me that he has another 244 in a 579. I bought myself poor on these other rifles, if anyone is interested in a mint 579 in 244, let me know ASAP, he wants $1499.00 for it...
     

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